Candace Couse

Monday, 10 October 2011

Farmhouse Dining Table and Bench


Farmhouse Dining Table and Bench

For plans see:


Staining the wood before assembling is best. A second coat afterwards and then finishing does the trick.


Constructing the notches is really the hardest part. After that it's all smooth sailing.




I worked on both the kitchen table, the dining table as well as the bench seat and all eight parson chairs together, so it took over a week to make this. I think if you were just doing the table you would be looking at a weekend project. Go hard or go home, unless you are home...





This is really a lot like building canvas stretchers. same rules apply for squaring off. 










I distressed the underbits of the table before assembling them because the violent nature of chaining the table until it screams our safe word would only make it unstable (physically and emotionally) after the fact. 



 Results:


End Result:





And When Put Together (Super Table):















34 comments:

  1. Where did you get those chairs?

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  2. Hi Emma,
    You can read about them here: http://landlocked-art.blogspot.com/2011/10/build-your-own-parson-ish-chair.html
    You can just buy any old chair from a flea market or wherever.

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  3. How did you construct the extra piece that joined the two tables. Your two tables are exactly what I have been wanting to make, but I couldn't figure out how to bridge the two tables. Thanks for the great inspiration.

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  4. Hi Erin,
    It was so easy. I just cut another breadboard, then I cut three small supports (like the ones used directly under the table top) from scrap. The first support sits on top of the leaf and overlaps slightly on both the kitchen and dining table. Obviously this is used to keep the breadboard leaf from falling through, then the last two supports run in the same direction underneath on each end of the leaf. This keeps it from rocking back and forth. I love this leaf because it is so easy to slide in and out and I love how rustic it looks. If you wanted a more polished look you could forgo the top support and simply screw in the two bottom supports to either table every time you use it. Personally I love the scrappy looking version I have as it has just the right amount of character and it incredibly quick and easy to use.
    Here is a text diagram on how to build it (lol!)

    (Kitchen T.)
    I----I----I
    (Dining T. )

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  5. P.S. Making this leaf allows the leg room needed to give you two extra seating places.

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  6. Nice work on the tables (and chairs too), I've just been looking around your blog and feeling terribly inspired. Thanks for sharing!

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  7. What kind of finishing did you do? What color of stain is it?

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  8. Hi Dabbling Crafter,
    I went with knotty pine for the wood. It's inexpensive and has a lot of character with the knots, although you should be sure to seal them if you go this route. I distressed the table with chains.I chose "dark walnut" as a stain and a low gloss finish (varathane clear-coat).

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  9. The table is gorgeous! Where did you get your beautiful dinnerware?

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  10. Thanks Sara. The dishes are stoneware made by Sears in 2007. I don't know if you can still get them...

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  11. Beautiful table (but you already know that...). Do you have any problems with crumbs or other stuff in the cracks? We made ours out of doug fir and found this to be a little bit of an issue. Placemats are going to be a necessity :)
    Love the color...awesome job !

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  12. Hey Jen,
    Thanks! Crumbs? Not too bad, but I know what you mean. The worst thing really was the top coat getting gummed up in some of the finer cracks. This bigger gaps don't give you as much trouble. Do you have a link to your table? Would love to see it!

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  13. I love your table and am going to build these Ana White plans too! Did you follow her plans exactly? I didn't see any modifications but I just wanted to make sure. Also, lots of people are talking about Kreg jigs. Did you use one? I don't have one, and I heard they are great, but I want to go ahead with this plan before I buy one. Any suggestions there?

    Thanks so much!

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    1. Hey Kristin, I modified the kitchen table, which is just like this one but smaller and can be found in the adjacent post. This one was exact as per Ana's plan. I don't know anything about kreg jigs, this table didn't require anything unusual. :) good luck!

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  14. I don't understand the big table. Is it one table or two put together? I can't tell from the pictures. Sorry, this is new to me, I would love this but I don't understand how you did it.
    Thanks, Kathi

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  15. Looks really great. Did you follow the Ana White instructions exactly? One thing I was concerned about was the number of screws in Steps 9 & 10. She claims to use three screws into each end of the apron boards, and then another three screws in each corner to attach it to the legs. That's an awful lot of screws for such a small space.

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    1. Hi Chris
      Yup, Ana White has it right. The screws help with keeping everything in tight. The table wants to bend and move as you go.

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  16. I love your table. I am right in the middle of building mine. I did the bench first so I could test out the process, but I'm finding that I'm not getting the finish I want. I love your finish. Can you take me step by step what you did and what products and tools you used? I really want a smooth, satiny finish that feels like furniture, vs. some stained wood from Lowe's. ;)

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  17. Hi Dpm,
    I talked about the distressing above. Other than that I just used a dark walnut stain. I did a couple coats of that and then added a hard finish thing...that's it.

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  18. looks amazing! great job. did you sand it then stain all of the pieces? also, did you stain it before you beat it up? thank you so much!

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  19. Thanks Tracy! All the pieces were sanded, some beaten, and finally stained, in that order.

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    Replies
    1. thank you! i am going to copy you :) you did a great job!

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  20. Candace. LOVE THE TABLE! My wife that I was loking at a showcase table from a store. 2 questions about wood to use. I don't have all the pine wood sizes in my locale, but there are 2 similar wood if you heard of them, Common and white board. Your choice of the two? Also, if you had a choice of wood other than pine, what would (wood) you use?

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  21. I usually have large family dinners and I am going to make this table longer. Instead of using the 7 2x6x81" boards, I am going to use 7 2x6x10' boards.

    My concern is the stretcher board underneath might bow a little bit and/or if I need additional support, where would you place it. In your opinion, how would you add additional support if needed for this length?

    Thank you

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  22. awesome table. what grit did you use on the table top?

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  23. Sorry, this was so long ago that I couldn't tell you. I will say that the pine is soft and the point is to give it a banged up, rough look. As such I used something fairly aggressive to smooth out splits and edges and finished with something fairly fine. Don't worry too much about marking the wood if your intentions are the same as mine were.

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  25. I'm absolutely in LOVE with this table! You did such an amazing job! I'm a little confused on how you made the leaf. Is it the plan that you shortened to 4 ft? Or is that a part that isn't pictured? Any info would be great! We just bought our first home and this is going to be the first thing that I make for it! ^_^ Again, amazing job!

    - Ashley

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  26. Hi Candace,
    Beautiful job! I really want to make this next weekend but am a little confused about the "Super Table". Is it 2 separate, identical tables? Thank you!

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  27. I worked on both the kitchen table, the dining table as well as the bench seat and all eight parson chairs together, so it took over a week to ... tdiningtable.blogspot.com

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  28. looks amazing! great job. did you sand it then stain all of the pieces? also, did you stain it before you beat it up? thank you so much!

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  29. Wow,..It's looking just amazing dining table,
    parsons dining table

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